Author Topic: Re-grouting.  (Read 885 times)

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Offline tonyb

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Re-grouting.
« Reply #10 on: July 25, 2011, 19:51:24 PM »
Rather than use a toothbrush, I'm pretty sure that if you went into Fethiye, you might be able to by a deck scrubber(no gags please.)They're made of the same material as the pads used on floor buffers. That way you get your tiles & your grout spotless. They are aboy 10" x 4" & you just slap them onto a plastic pad with a pole attached, would take no time at all. Hope this helps. I think they're made by Scotch.



Offline usedbustickets

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Re-grouting.
« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2011, 19:52:43 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by Ovacikpeedoff

If the grout is not too bad you could use lemon juice. The guy who used to do our pool used an acid that we bought from a shop near the otogar. It was 1 part acid and 4 parts water. The result was top class. It did not damage the tiles or the grout

He also used the same mixture to clean the pool tiles and grout and we never had a problem.


OPO how did he apply the mixture, is it possible to do larger areas than using the scourer/toothbrush using this mixture?

Offline FrankStanley

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Re-grouting.
« Reply #12 on: July 25, 2011, 20:01:03 PM »
thanks Mark, will get some and try it in september.
Have been using a local bleach (klorak) for the grout cleaning.

Offline Ovacikpeedoff

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« Reply #13 on: July 25, 2011, 21:11:06 PM »
Lemon juice I used to use a toothbrush. When the gardener did the tiles he applied it using a hard bristled yard brush. When he was finished we would then use a mop like normal floor washing to make double sure there was no nasty surprises like getting bare feet burnt. Never any problems and the group and tiles cameup looking like new. He did any place where we had tiled floors likethe kitchen,bathrooms and hallways. Being a resourceful Turk he wear the bubber gloves weused for washing up and bin bags over his shoes to protect them.

Offline Anne

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« Reply #14 on: July 25, 2011, 21:29:56 PM »
Do you know the name of the stuff?

Offline kenkay

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Re-grouting.
« Reply #15 on: July 25, 2011, 21:32:36 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by FrankStanley

thanks Mark, will get some and try it in september.
Have been using a local bleach (klorak) for the grout cleaning.

I've been weighing up doing ours and just tested a small area with Klorak. It is effective but as it is the old Kimmick (pure sodium hypochlorite) I would keep the place well ventilated whilst doing larger areas  8)

Offline Ovacikpeedoff

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« Reply #16 on: July 25, 2011, 22:35:01 PM »
All I was told it is acid spelt acit. There is a shop near the crossroads near the Otogar on the Antalya roaad with brusehes and mops outside. It was inthat shop. I told him what I wanted it for and he gave it to me. It is powerful stuff and needs to be handled very carefully. It is either sulphuric acid or hydrochloric acid.

Offline Anne

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« Reply #17 on: July 25, 2011, 22:45:58 PM »
thanks, will check it out.

Offline scouser2

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« Reply #18 on: July 26, 2011, 09:28:04 AM »
Thanks for all the info Guys.
Chris.




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