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Offline Murphy2

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« on: August 05, 2005, 12:25:35 PM »
Can anyone tell me if i have to be a resident to take a container into Turkey or what paperwork i require.  I have a villa there but have been told i need to be a resident.  I am not taking any electrical goods as customs is too expensive, just a few personal things, will i also have to pay duty on these.

Also are there any English people that would like to send their child to a Montessori nursery.  I would like to continue with this, but as materials are very expensive, i don't want to buy too much then find i have no clients.  Age range would be from 2 - 8 years.  It would only be a few hours a day.  It would also be very small scale, using 1 room in my villa, about 4/5 children at any one time.  Montessori is following the child and teaching at their own pace.Practical life area is very good for the younger child as it develops their independence, improves concentration and develops fine motor skills.  If anyone is interested i can tell you more about it and go over the equipment that i use.  Look forward in hearing from you

Murphy 2



Offline dennisandrea

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« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2005, 12:48:36 PM »
hi murphy and welcome,if you do a search you will find all the information you need on importing household goods,its been covered before,also there our strict laws in turkey on working there,i pasted this article to get you started...goodluck...
Importing your household goods for a vacation or a retirement home
Those who have a work permit may not have as many hassles and may not pay duty. The information below applies to those who have a retirement or vacation home in Turkey.

To import personal effects and furniture, you will first need:

a) a house title (not just a land title, a house title) or a rental contract
b) a valid residence permit
c) an inventory list in Turkish with the value of each box
d) cash to pay the import duty that comes to around 33% of the value of your goods (even though each item will be assessed separately, the total averages out to around 33%). In lieu of cash, you will need a bank guarantee for the dutiable amount and that guarantee has a high fee payable every 3 months while you are living here. Best to pay the cash. In theory, if you re-export all your things, you get it back. We'll see!

In the law, vacationers and retirees do not have the right to import furniture and personal effects. In fact, many do imports goods and they get cleared through customs. However, there are some do's and don'ts that will make the process less painful.

All household goods must be imported in one shipment. You cannot import some goods now and some later separately. You also cannot import one shipment in your name and a second shipment in your spouse's name. Your goods and personal effects can be imported ONLY for the duration of your residence permit; by law they must be re-exported when your permit expires although it is questionable if this is verified.

Items that are consumable such as canned or packaged food, chemicals of any kind, shampoo, dog treats or dog food, modeling clay and anything that can spoil is not allowed. This is based on the idea that such items would spoil if kept for the duration of the residence permit, usually 5 years. Antique carpets are also forbidden for import. Lest you think you can hide things, the Customs officials open your boxes to verify their contents.

If you ship less than 500 kilos, the procedure is simple and you can probably clear customs within 1 day, maybe without even using a Custom's Broker. You will still want to hire a shipping company to transport your things to your new home. Ask the shipper about insurance during transport. If offered at the point of origin, buy insurance from door to door. I didn't and it was a mistake. If you buy insurance here, you will need the license plate number of the truck to obtain the insurance.

If you have more than 500 kilos of household and personal items, expect a looooong bureaucratic hassle and at least 2 weeks to get your things. Hire a good custom's agent, a good shipping company and expect to pay about 33% in import duties, plus port charges if your things arrived by boat.

If you sent things by boat, you must either get them cleared within 5 days or pay storage charges for the container. Get to the port on the same day the shipment arrives and have all the above documents plus your passport in hand. The Customs will take your inventory list and codify each and every item to determine that item's duty percentage and value. This procedure takes anywhere from 3 days to 10 days depending on what you have. If your shipper at home tells you to make a very detailed inventory, DON'T (except for your own information)! I was told this and it only complicated and delayed the process by several days.

Don't try to import a car if you plan to stay longer than 6 months (and do not have a valid work visa). Even if you are willing to pay the 70-80% KDV, you still cannot import a car if you are not officially working here.

If you plan to spend less than 6 months, then you can drive into Turkey but you must take your car out not 1 day after the allowable 6 month period, and the car must remain outside Turkey for several months (6?) before being brought in again. You can bring a car in for 1 year under certain circumstances, but you must then export it and you can NEVER re-enter Turkey with that same car. In practice, this means you cannot import it at all.

Hope this helps smooth the process.

dennis

Offline smudge

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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2005, 21:20:11 PM »
Hi i think Dennis has covered the moving process very well, i will add that our goods came overland via Istanbul with much less hassle than we are hearing about in Izmir.
Regarding the nursery i would like to discuss this further, we have an 8 month old, born here, to young at the moment but maybe in the future, so long as Turkish children attend as well.
Also i am NNEB qualified and have some experience in Montessori.
I have often thought about starting a nursery when baby is older but it is very difficult to work here.
Good luck with the move let us know when you are arriving
Elaine.

Offline What

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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2005, 22:18:02 PM »
Dennis seems to have covered most of it, but I will add a little.
My container came into Izmir. I had used a shipping agent, that avoided me having to go to Izmir. I too was advised to make only a brief description of what was in it - tell no lies but be economical with what you say. Only the electrical goods had to be detailed (including serial numbers)as they attract a heavy Banderol tax.
The Banderol tax paid (£1000) will be returned to me after 5 years if I can prove that I have all of the items listed still in my possession after that time. That means you throw nothing away if it stops working. This is to stop you bringing things in to sell.
You will have to do the sums about whether it is better to buy electrical stuff out here. The Turkish customs web site covers the Banderol tax and the rates. When I looked at it, there was not much in it and it was nice to have familiar stuff with me. Banderol was only paid by me on electrical stuff, so if I had not brought any of it I would not have paid that tax and could have used the money to buy white goods (but I would have had to dispose of all my electrical goods for little money - that is the equation). The only thing I did not bring was my TV as I was not sure if it would work here.
Contrary to the experience Dennis had, none of my boxes had been opened at customs. It was explained that this is one benefit of using an established shipping agent with good paperwork, but I have no way of knowing if that was true. I shipped 1000 kilo.
The biggest problem I had was that I could not get my stuff through customs until I had my Residence Permit and that took 10 weeks! My container had to sit in the dock all that time. It was suggested (not by my agent who acted impeccably throughout) that a backhander might speed things, but I was not interested in that option.
On insurance, you may find in the small print, that you are paying on the replacement cost in the destination country - not UK prices, which on some things is a considerable difference. As it was I had nothing lost or broken thanks to the very good job done by the packers. I used Dolphin removals in UK, who then passed over to Soyer in this country.

Offline Murphy2

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« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2005, 11:09:58 AM »
Thanks Dennis,Smudge,What , What a great help you have all been.  I now know what to expect.  Must say not looking forward to clearing my goods.  Also Smudge, all children are welcome, at the moment just putting felers out to see if anyone is interested.  Off course i will need to get a visa first.  Hope to be there by Christmas.

Offline smudge

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« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2005, 19:07:00 PM »
A small addition to what has been said, when we negotiated our removal costs we got 3 months free storage for our goods in UK, this meant we came to Turkey with nothing but hand luggage but we had already partly furnished our new home,so as soon as we got our residents visas we faxed copies to UK and they then released our goods for transport hence no customs storage charge.
Company used was Davies Turner.

Offline amanda

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« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2005, 12:34:55 PM »
HI WHAT.
      Great to read that i am using the same company. hope it is as good as you say.
amanda

Offline What

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« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2005, 22:06:15 PM »
Hi Amanda
My partner did most of the organising. She got quotes from a number but this combination was the best. In fact we contacted Soyer having seen their ad in Land of Lights and they put us on to Dolphin.
Dolphin were fantastic, and repacked things we had made a botch of until they were satisfied.
Soyers boss in Izmir speaks perfect English and responded to our emails very quickly. He was precise in every detail, and when the customs transaction was ready to complete, he contacted us and told us what to send, and to where, and a few days later our stuff was delivered to the house.
If I was doing it again (never, I hope) I would have brought more of the things we got rid of such as books and pictures. We had overestimated the cost of the shipment and were pleasantly suprised to have a lower bill than the original estimate. Unfortunately this came only after Dolphin got all the load to their site to check weight and volume: the primary factor is volume. Once you are above the 500 kilo level explained by Dennis (above) you might as well take whatever you want as you are not going to get any extra hassle for a few more items.
Some people suggest bringing very little, but we found great comfort in having familiar things with us. Making the move is one thing, but you don't have to leave the things you are comfortable with behind.

Offline stuart

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« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2005, 15:28:59 PM »
having done it myself, i would never do it again, i would sell all my stuff at autions, dump what i couldnt sell and have a couple of crates of personal stuff sent over, buy all new in turkey.

Offline KKOB

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« Reply #9 on: August 11, 2005, 10:51:19 AM »
Having done it myself, I'd have no hesitation in doing it again !




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